An Artful Education

This month we focused on resuming routines and being back at school. We explored the complexities of learning and the compelling relationships between educators and their students.  But learning doesn’t always take place within the confines of a classroom and it certainly encompasses much more than the guidelines of a curriculum.

Extracurricular activities.  The mere mention is enough to make some recoil and others rush to registration, checkbook in hand.  It has been hotly debated lately (what hasn’t been when it comes to parenting?) with some taking the position that our children are over programmed and lack time for free play.  Others disagree and see extracurricular activities as vital to rounding out a child’s education.

Last week Leslie Foster’s Top 10 Reasons Your Kids Need Extracurricular Arts-Based Activities struck a nerve.  Perhaps it was because I was waffling on my decision to sign the boys up for more sports than I had intended this fall.  I had succumbed to their demands for soccer, swimming, karate, tennis and squash with nary a thought of exactly how I was going to transport all three boys to three different destinations at three different times and now my plate feels full.  Perhaps it was because each of my boys expressed sadness that they, in effort to minimize the intensity of a packed scheduled, were no longer enrolled in their respective art class/piano lessons/music and movement class.

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In my haste to ensure they were registered and equipped for their team sports, art took a back seat.  More so than being surprised by their request to resume their arts-based activities, I was pleased that my boys recognized in themselves a desire to be creative and express themselves artistically.

And so I will reach deep into my pockets, get creative with the schedule and call in favors to make it work.

But what about the kids who are not so fortunate as to ask and receive?

Artbarn School, a not-for-profit art school in Toronto offers a variety of art classes for children and adults. From watercolour and oil painting, drawing, encaustic and mixed media, these classes are taught by dedicated, enthusiastic artists eager to share their passion with budding creative-types.

Linda McMaster co-founder and Executive Director of Artbarn School, was aware that not all children who have an affection for art but not the financial means to register for the courses.

McMaster got the idea to start the scholarship when approached by a recently widowed mother of three whose son showed great artistic potential but she did not have the funds to register him for classes. The student’s skills not only blossomed but he thrived under the mentorship of his teacher.

Raising Artists is an event dedicated to raising the designers, architects, artists and creative thinkers of tomorrow with all proceeds directed toward the scholarship.

Children can explore the studio and participate in a variety of activities while the adults enjoy live music, appetizers and bid on the artwork created by their children. The budding-artists proudly showcase their work while their confidence soars.

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Many of our readers do not live in Toronto, but I hope you’re inspired by the initiative the Artbarn has taken to make extracurricular activities more accessible to families. Perhaps you’re inspired to get involved with your community organizations and improve the accessibility of extracurricular activities. Similarly, be sure to contact organizations to see if scholarship opportunities exist before deciding it’s not in the budget.

For Your Calendar:

Raising Artists

Artbarn School, 250 Eglinton Avenue West, Toronto

Thursday, November 20 from 6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Tickets are $20 and must be purchased in advance.

416-518-6108

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